Redevelopment of London’s Battersea Power Station in Progress

The redevelopment of the historic Battersea Power Station in London, England continues to make progress. Battersea is an adaptive re-use project that is unprecedented in its scope. When completed, this will be one of the most exciting and innovative mixed-use neighborhoods in the world– a place for locals, tourists and residents to enjoy a unique blend of restaurants, shops, parks, and cultural spaces. The 42-acre site encompassed in the Battersea Power Station will revitalize the surrounding area.

Currently the largest construction project happening in Europe, this massive undertaking is led by the Battersea Power Station Development Company and will be carried out over 7 phases. Construction manager, Mace, is ensuring Battersea’s restoration runs smoothly with architects Wilkinson Eyre and conservation architects at Purcell Architects. Boston Valley Terra Cotta is currently working with Szerelmey on the Battersea project, creating terra cotta masonry that is currently being installed onsite.

Interior masonry units have been fabricated for the Battersea Power Station using the extrusion and ram press forming methods. The blue speckled glaze application on the terra cotta blocks was formulated to match the original surface treatment of the building.

Once completed, the surrounding area will benefit greatly from the restoration with new access to the London underground and diverse offerings that had not been there during its decommissioned state. The redevelopment of Battersea Power Station is set to be completed in 2020.

 

Battersea Power Station, Boston Valley Terra Cotta, London, England, Szerelmey

Masonry units in the interior of Battersea Power Station.

 

Battersea Power Station, Boston Valley Terra Cotta, London, England, Szerelmey

Masonry created for Battersea ranges from bricks to geometric friezes.

 

Battersea Power Station, Boston Valley Terra Cotta, London, England, Szerelmey

Masonry created for Battersea ranges from bricks to geometric frieze.

Read our previous blog post on the Battersea Power Station here.