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Massive Terra Cotta Ornaments Revive Classical Style

December 17, 2014 in Boston Valley Terra Cotta by Tricia Herby

For the historic Tomochichi Federal Courthouse in Savannah, Georgia, restoration of the building has yielded large and intricately detailed pieces here at Boston Valley. The carefully sculpted ornamental brackets stand at around three and a half feet tall, and are fabricated with incredible detail, both in the ornamental sculpture and in the building attachment brackets.

Historic, architectural restoration, terra cotta, Tomochichi, Georgia

The scale and detail of these brackets make for a very imposing and impressive façade

Historic, architectural restoration, terra cotta, Tomochichi, Georgia

3D model of corner bracket

The Tomochichi Federal Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Buildings in 1974, and the entire façade is heavily ornamented. These pieces are going to be featured on the underside of the roof soffit. 129 single corbels and 12 corner corbels are currently in production

 Tomochichi Federal Courthouse, Savannah, Georgia, terracotta, architectural restoration, boston valley terra cotta

Many of these pieces are currently being made in the shop.

Roswell Park Clinical Sciences Center Features Terra Cotta Panels & Louvers

December 11, 2014 in TerraClad, Uncategorized by Tricia Herby

In the heart of the rapidly expanding medical campus of downtown Buffalo, NY, Roswell Park Cancer Institute is constructing an expansion of its own. The Roswell Park Clinical Sciences Center features custom terra cotta panels and louvers on its facade. The completed project will include 12,475 lineal feet of TerraClad™ louvers. Harmon, Inc. is panelizing and installing the facade units.

Roswell Park Clinical Sciences Center, Terra Cotta louvers, terraclad, Boston Valley Terra Cotta

Part of the completed portion of the facade
Roswell Park Clinical Sciences Center, Terra Cotta louvers, terraclad, Boston Valley Terra Cotta

Closer look at the ribbed terra cotta panels with corresponding airfoil louvers.

The 11-story building is currently under construction, right next to the existing Roswell Park Cancer Institute main building. More information on the expansion can be found at the Roswell Park website.

With the steel frame completed, 3 stories of the building are already clad

 

 

Custom Glaze on 59th Street & Columbus Circle Station, NYC

December 5, 2014 in Uncategorized by Tricia Herby

If you travel using the subway system in NYC, be sure to look around you while passing through the station at 59th Street and Columbus Circle. Three years ago the terra cotta adorning the walls of this station was cleaned, repaired and restored, revealing some of the most detailed and interesting terra cotta originally produced by the Grueby Faience Company. William H Grueby founded his company in 1894 in Boston, MA; it specialized in the production of ceramic vases, architectural terra cotta and faience tiles.

Grueby’s fame spread and his work became world-renowned upon his development of a matte green glaze which became his signature finish. Boston Valley Terra Cotta’s R&D Glaze department was tasked with replicating this matte green glaze for our restoration of approximately 60 blocks. Three years after completion of this project our work still looks great!

Columbus Circle, NYC, custom glaze, terra cotta, boston valley terra cotta

This tile depicting a ship at sea is one of the most recognizable features of the work in this station.

Columbus Circle, NYC, custom glaze, terra cotta, boston valley terra cotta

Bas-relief details in terra cotta units with the famous Grueby matte green glaze.

Boston Valley & Homer Laughlin China – Two American Ceramic Manufacturers

October 23, 2014 in Uncategorized by Tricia Herby

The Homer Laughlin China Co. was recently featured in NPR’s American Made Series as an excellent example of an American manufacturing company that has been in constant operation since it’s founding in 1873. Many people know of Homer Laughlin’s Fiesta pottery line, fewer are aware of the companies deep history in developing the first major whiteware manufacturing plant in the United States. This whiteware is now a standard of excellence for many hotel and restaurant operations who are the primary consumers of this product. Boston Valley is proud to have two connects to Homer Laughlin: first our shared history as a long-standing American ceramic manufacturer; and second our use of rejected Homer Laughlin whiteware as a raw material in our clay mixture. Previously fired ceramic material, known as grog, is one component of the terra cotta clay recipe. Boston Valley purchases rejected pieces and scrap from Homer Laughlin, grinds the pieces up, and mixes this with our own recycled material to add to our clay mixtures. This industrial recycling process provides LEED credit opportunities for owners and architects interested in green products!

Plates, cups, bowls and other dinnerware rejected during Homer Laughlin's QC process are shipped to Boston Valley to be ground up and put into terra cotta clay recipes.

Plates, cups, bowls and other dinnerware rejected during Homer Laughlin’s QC process are shipped to Boston Valley to be ground up and put into terra cotta clay recipes.

Fully Custom Prototyping in Boston Valley’s ARCH Design Lab

October 13, 2014 in Boston Valley ARCH Design Lab by Boston Valley

Boston Valley Terra Cotta’s ARCH Design lab is milling custom dies that will be used for our prototype extrusion press.

boston valley terra cotta, arch design lab, prototyping, architecture

The plastic dies are easy to mill and allow the team at Boston Valley to produce prototype panels and blocks quicker and more efficiently.

boston valley terra cotta, arch design lab, prototyping, architecture

Boston Valley Terra Cotta – Resilient Company, Resilient Product

October 8, 2014 in #ConsiderTerraCotta, Uncategorized by Boston Valley

Looking at pictures of Boston Valley Terra Cotta today, you would never guess that it came from such humble beginnings. Now a company that is a worldwide manufacturer of architectural terra cotta for restoration and rain screen installations, Boston Valley was once a simple brick manufacturing facility.

Boston Valley Terra Cotta, circa 1930, architectural, historic, terra cotta

Boston Valley Terra Cotta circa 1930

 

Boston Valley Terra Cotta, circa 1930, architectural, historic, terra cotta

In the pictures above, you can see the original building that was built in 1889. The Krouse family later bought the factory when it was a clay pot manufacturer in 1981. Andrew Krouse and his four sons took the clay pot factory and quickly turned it into a global competitor for architectural terra cotta and ceramics. The first restoration Boston Valley completed was the Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York. Thirty-five years later we are a growing company that has been awarded contracts for some of the most notable buildings around the globe. Many new products have been introduced to the construction industry but very few have been able to surpass terra cotta in terms of longevity. It is a resilient material with the ability to withstand severe climates and UV exposure. 

The Krouse family takes great pride in making not only an exceptional product, but making sure our family values extend to the health and safety of all our employees. We are very proud to say we have several employees who have made Boston Valley Terra Cotta their career. We look forward to providing durable, sustainable, and beautifully designed products to the construction industry for the next thirty-five years.

Boston Valley Terra Cotta, architectural, historic, terra cotta

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